Kolari Vision IR Chrome: an optical filter for infrared photographs without changing your camera sensor

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Infrared photography is one of the most striking photographic techniques. Whether with analog film or with optical filters and special cameras, the texture and color that can be achieved with this technique is characteristic. If you want to take digital infrared images, you can do so now without having to remove the IR filter from the sensor. Thanks to the new Kolari Vision IR Chrome.

Kolari Vision IR Chrome: an optical filter for infrared photographs without changing your camera sensor

Kolari’s optical filter was developed to emulate the characteristic colors of Kodak Aerochrome film, a role for infrared photography whose popularity has returned to the market. At this point, the IR Chrome hit begins, rolls of positive film are no longer produced, so they are only obtained through auctions that have already expired and with the uncertainty of knowing integrity for good results. This means that the price for each roll is not less than $ 80.

Another point in favor of the IR Chrome is that a full spectrum camera (without changing the sensor’s cover and filter) can capture this type of image. Typically, in digital IR photography, users must sacrifice a body, modify the sensor, remove the protection of infrared filtering, and achieve different results with optical filters. You can also recall sounds directly, so you do not have to play with the channel mixer in Photoshop. You can see more pictures taken with this filter on the Kolaris page.

Kolari Vision IR Chrome: an optical filter for infrared photographs without changing your camera sensor

As PetaPixel reports, the IR Chrome will start at around 43 euros (for 37mm rings) and up to 166 euros (for a 95mm ring). If a 4 “x 5.65” filter is required for square filter holders and film cameras, you can purchase it for just over $ 300. It is currently on presale for those who wish to receive it from the Kolivivision website and allow international shipping.

Cover image | Yann Philippe, via Kolaris

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